ISO 31-11

From formulasearchengine
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Template:Use British (Oxford) English Template:SpecialChars

ISO 31-11 was the part of international standard ISO 31 that defines mathematical signs and symbols for use in physical sciences and technology. It was superseded in 2009 by ISO 80000-2.[1]

Its definitions include the following:[2]

Mathematical logic

Sign Example Name Meaning and verbal equivalent Remarks
pq conjunction sign p and q
pq disjunction sign p or q (or both)
¬ ¬ p negation sign negation of p; not p; non p
pq implication sign if p then q; p implies q Can also be written as qp. Sometimes → is used.
xA p(x)
(∀xA) p(x)
universal quantifier for every x belonging to A, the proposition p(x) is true The "∈A" can be dropped where A is clear from context.
xA p(x)
(∃xA) p(x)
existential quantifier there exists an x belonging to A for which the proposition p(x) is true The "∈A" can be dropped where A is clear from context.
∃! is used where exactly one x exists for which p(x) is true.

Sets

Sign Example Meaning and verbal equivalent Remarks
xA x belongs to A; x is an element of the set A
xA x does not belong to A; x is not an element of the set A The negation stroke can also be vertical.
Ax the set A contains x (as an element) same meaning as xA
Ax the set A does not contain x (as an element) same meaning as xA
{ } {x1, x2, ..., xn} set with elements x1, x2, ..., xn also {xiiI}, where I denotes a set of indices
{ ∣ } {xAp(x)} set of those elements of A for which the proposition p(x) is true Example: {x ∈ ℝ ∣ x > 5}
The ∈A can be dropped where this set is clear from the context.
card card(A) number of elements in A; cardinal of A
AB difference between A and B; A minus B The set of elements which belong to A but not to B.
AB = { xxAxB }
AB should not be used.
the empty set
the set of natural numbers; the set of positive integers and zero ℕ = {0, 1, 2, 3, ...}
Exclusion of zero is denoted by an asterisk:
* = {1, 2, 3, ...}
k = {0, 1, 2, 3, ..., k − 1}
the set of integers ℤ = {..., −3, −2, −1, 0, 1, 2, 3, ...}

* = ℤ ∖ {0} = {..., −3, −2, −1, 1, 2, 3, ...}

the set of rational numbers * = ℚ ∖ {0}
the set of real numbers * = ℝ ∖ {0}
the set of complex numbers * = ℂ ∖ {0}
[, ] [a, b] closed interval in ℝ from a (included) to b (included) [a, b] = {x ∈ ℝ ∣ axb}
], ]
(, ]
]a, b]
(a, b]
left half-open interval in ℝ from a (excluded) to b (included) ]a, b] = {x ∈ ℝ ∣ a < xb}
[, [
[, )
[a, b[
[a, b)
right half-open interval in ℝ from a (included) to b (excluded) [a, b[ = {x ∈ ℝ ∣ ax < b}
], [
(, )
]a, b[
(a, b)
open interval in ℝ from a (excluded) to b (excluded) ]a, b[ = {x ∈ ℝ ∣ a < x < b}
BA B is included in A; B is a subset of A Every element of B belongs to A. ⊂ is also used.
BA B is properly included in A; B is a proper subset of A Every element of B belongs to A, but B is not equal to A. If ⊂ is used for "included", then ⊊ should be used for "properly included".
CA C is not included in A; C is not a subset of A ⊄ is also used.
AB A includes B (as subset) A contains every element of B. ⊃ is also used. BA means the same as AB.
AB. A includes B properly. A contains every element of B, but A is not equal to B. If ⊃ is used for "includes", then ⊋ should be used for "includes properly".
AC A does not include C (as subset) ⊅ is also used. AC means the same as CA.
AB union of A and B The set of elements which belong to A or to B or to both A and B.
AB = { xxAxB }
union of a collection of sets , the set of elements belonging to at least one of the sets A1, …, An. and , are also used, where I denotes a set of indices.
AB intersection of A and B The set of elements which belong to both A and B.
AB = { xxAxB }
intersection of a collection of sets , the set of elements belonging to all sets A1, …, An. and , ⋂iI are also used, where I denotes a set of indices.
AB complement of subset B of A The set of those elements of A which do not belong to the subset B. The symbol A is often omitted if the set A is clear from context. Also ∁AB = AB.
(, ) (a, b) ordered pair a, b; couple a, b (a, b) = (c, d) if and only if a = c and b = d.
a, b⟩ is also used.
(, …, ) (a1a2, …, an) ordered n-tuple a1, a2, …, an⟩ is also used.
× A × B cartesian product of A and B The set of ordered pairs (a, b) such that aA and bB.
A × B = { (a, b) ∣ aAbB }
A × A × ⋯ × A is denoted by An, where n is the number of factors in the product.
Δ ΔA set of pairs (a, a) ∈ A × A where aA; diagonal of the set A × A ΔA = { (a, a) ∣ aA }
idA is also used.

Miscellaneous signs and symbols

Sign Example Meaning and verbal equivalent Remarks

ab a is by definition equal to b [2] := is also used
= a = b a equals b ≡ may be used to emphasize that a particular equality is an identity.
ab a is not equal to b may be used to emphasize that a is not identically equal to b.
ab a corresponds to b On a 1:106 map: 1 cm ≙ 10 km.
ab a is approximately equal to b The symbol ≃ is reserved for "is asymptotically equal to".

ab
ab
a is proportional to b
< a < b a is less than b
> a > b a is greater than b
ab a is less than or equal to b The symbol ≦ is also used.
ab a is greater than or equal to b The symbol ≧ is also used.
ab a is much less than b
ab a is much greater than b
infinity
( )
[ ]
{ }
(a+b)c
[a+b]c
{a+b}c
a+bc
ac+bc, parentheses
ac+bc, square brackets
ac+bc, braces
ac+bc, angle brackets
In ordinary algebra, the sequence of (), [], {}, in order of nesting is not standardized. Special uses are made of (), [], {}, in particular fields.[3]
AB ∥ CD the line AB is parallel to the line CD
ABCD the line AB is perpendicular to the line CD[4]

Operations

Sign Example Meaning and verbal equivalent Remarks
+ a + b a plus b
ab a minus b
± a ± b a plus or minus b
ab a minus or plus b −(a ± b) = −ab
... ... ... ...

Functions

Example Meaning and verbal equivalent Remarks
function f has domain D and codomain C Used to explicitly define the domain and codomain of a function.
Set of all possible outputs in the codomain when given inputs from S, a subset of the domain of f.

Exponential and logarithmic functions

Example Meaning and verbal equivalent Remarks
[[e (mathematical constant)|Template:Mvar]] base of natural logarithms Template:Mvar = 2.718 28...
Template:MvarTemplate:Mvar exponential function to the base Template:Mvar of Template:Mvar
logTemplate:Mvar Template:Mvar logarithm to the base Template:Mvar of Template:Mvar
lb Template:Mvar binary logarithm (to the base 2) of Template:Mvar lb Template:Mvar = log2 Template:Mvar
ln Template:Mvar natural logarithm (to the base Template:Mvar) of Template:Mvar ln Template:Mvar = logTemplate:Mvar Template:Mvar
lg Template:Mvar common logarithm (to the base 10) of Template:Mvar lg Template:Mvar = log10 Template:Mvar
... ... ...

Circular and hyperbolic functions

Example Meaning and verbal equivalent Remarks
π ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter π = 3.141 59...
... ... ...

Complex numbers

Example Meaning and verbal equivalent Remarks
Template:Mvar   Template:Mvar imaginary unit; Template:Mvar² = −1 In electrotechnology, Template:Mvar is generally used.
Re Template:Mvar real part of Template:Mvar Template:Mvar = Template:Mvar + Template:MvarTemplate:Mvar, where Template:Mvar = Re Template:Mvar and Template:Mvar = Im Template:Mvar
Im Template:Mvar imaginary part of Template:Mvar
Template:Mvar absolute value of Template:Mvar; modulus of Template:Mvar mod Template:Mvar is also used
arg Template:Mvar argument of Template:Mvar; phase of Template:Mvar Template:Mvar = Template:MvarTemplate:MvarTemplate:MvarTemplate:Mvar, where Template:Mvar = ∣Template:Mvar∣ and Template:Mvar = arg Template:Mvar, i.e. Re Template:Mvar = Template:Mvar cos Template:Mvar and Im Template:Mvar = Template:Mvar sin Template:Mvar
Template:Mvar* (complex) conjugate of Template:Mvar sometimes a bar above Template:Mvar is used instead of Template:Mvar*
sgn Template:Mvar signum Template:Mvar sgn Template:Mvar = Template:Mvar / ∣Template:Mvar∣ = exp(Template:Mvar arg Template:Mvar) for Template:Mvar ≠ 0, sgn 0 = 0

Matrices

Example Meaning and verbal equivalent Remarks
A matrix A ...
... ... ...

Coordinate systems

Coordinates Position vector and its differential Name of coordinate system Remarks
x, y, z [x y z] = [x y z]; [dx dy dz]; cartesian x1, x2, x3 for the coordinates and e1, e2, e3 for the base vectors are also used. This notation easily generalizes to n-mensional space. ex, ey, ex form an orthonormal right-handed system. For the base vectors, i, j, k are also used.
ρ, φ, z [x, y, z] = [ρ cos(φ), ρ sin(φ), z] cylindrical eρ(φ), eφ(φ), ez form an orthonormal right-handed system. lf z= 0, then ρ and φ are the polar coordinates.
r, θ, φ [x, y, z] = r [sin(θ)cos(φ), sin(θ)sin(φ), cos(θ)] spherical er(θ,φ), eθ(θ,φ),eφ(φ) form an orthonormal right-handed system.

Vectors and tensors

Example Meaning and verbal equivalent Remarks
a
vector a Instead of italic boldface, vectors can also be indicated by an arrow above the letter symbol. Any vector a can be multiplied by a scalar k, i.e. ka.
... ... ...

Special functions

Example Meaning and verbal equivalent Remarks
Template:MvarTemplate:Mvar(Template:Mvar) cylindrical Bessel functions (of the first kind) ...
... ... ...

See also

References and notes

  1. Template:Cite web
  2. 2.0 2.1 {{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}
  3. These brace or fence characters are upper level unicode characters, fairly recently established and so may not display correctly in every browser. A close approximation of the appearance is found in the standard Latin characters: ( ), [ ], { }, < >. A more accurate glyph depiction of the mathematical angle bracket characters are found in the Chinese-Japanese-Korean (CJK) punctuation category: &#x3008h; &#x3009h;.
  4. If the perpendicular symbol, &#x27C2h;, does not display correctly, it is similar to &#x22A5h; (up tack: sometimes meaning orthogonal to) and it also appears similar to &#x23CAh; (the dentistry: symbol light up and horizontal)

Template:ISO standards